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Polyvore.com allows users to swipe copywritten material from anywhere on the web and import it onto the site and then create collages or "sets" from imported images. Polyvore supplies the graphics application which can be used to create derivative works and remove watermarks and copyright information from imported images.

More often than not these images are not credited back to the original creator and in nearly every instance images are swiped without the express permission of their creators.

Here, www.flickr.com/photos/8504507@… Pasha Sadri, owner of the Polyvore website, admits in a response to an artist whose original artwork was stolen and manipulated using Polyvore's graphics application to make illegal derivatives, "polyvore is meant to be a fashion website. people clip product images (from a site like gap.com) and use the images to create fashion layouts. that is why we have the clipping tool. we potentially earn money if someone goes from polyvore to gap to buy that product (eg: gap pays us a commision). we do not directly sell anything, like your images."

This means this service is a partnership with large retailers. This also means there is absolutely no reason why Polyvore should include an ability to clip any and every image from across the net if it is merely a "fashion website".

Polyvore has not actively educated its users on copyright and has not taken any initiative to aid in the protection of intellectual property, rather it has created an atmosphere that not only condones but encourages intellectual property theft. Coupled with the fact that the owner of the website has made his intentions clear, that the website is to be a "fashion website" and nothing more, this gross misuse of intellectual property that is so clearly outside the scope of the website's intent must cease immediately.

Cease and desist letters have been sent by droves of artists whose images were stolen from blogs, personal websites, portfolios, and venues through which work is sold and although images are taken down initially, many of the same images reappear on the site later on. A cease and desist does *not* expire and should not need to be sent more than once.

Images are taken from direct sources in an overwhelming majority of instances where the owner of the original work is easily accessible to reach regarding use of their work on the website. Users do not do this and simply import these images as they are found. Polyvore's system makes this a one click action aiding in the swift theft of intellectual property which is a direct violation of United States Copyright Laws.

Because this problem has persisted for the last year without a solution that satisfies both sides set in place as well as Pasha Sadri's apathy and subsequent income while artists original work become "casualties" of Polyvore's service and ultimate goal, we artists feel we have no other choice than to publicly call for the Polyvore website to be shut down or the removal of all images not owned by companies Polyvore.com is directly affiliated with either through written permission from individual artists or prior and future commitments with retailers.

With the Orphan Bills Act in Congress currently we as artists need to be diligent in enforcing our copyrights now more than ever.

If you would like more information regarding this ongoing issue, please visit the following links to see individual artists take on the matter -

etsynews.com/607/is-polyvore-s…

www.redbubble.com/people/croku… right-theft-at-polyvore-com

www.etsy.com/forums_thread.php…

www.etsy.com/forums_thread.php…

And most recently....

www.etsy.com/forums_thread.php…

We artists need to protect out intellectual property and will not stand idly by while our work is so clearly infringed upon. Thank you for your support.

****


Yes, there is a petition making the rounds. Regardless of your feelings on online petitions and their effectiveness or lack thereof, it's a single place to come together and have one's voice heard, should you find yourself against Polyvore's current practices. www.gopetition.com/petitions/c…
Add a Comment:
 
:iconriurio:
RiuRio Featured By Owner Nov 30, 2010
Oh for crying out load, just stop them from clipping images from your site. It's really quite simple.
Reply
:iconsagittariusgallery:
sagittariusgallery Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2010  Professional Traditional Artist
Heh. Not so easy to do when one sells through 3rd party venues.

So, really, it's not quite so simple.

This also does not negate the fact that permission must be obtained to utilize copyrighted work in such a way.

I will say Polyvore, last I checked, has been addressing these concerns. This is really rather old news seeing as the article was posted 2 years ago. For crying out not as loudly.
Reply
:iconriurio:
RiuRio Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2010
There's no need for sarcasm _
Reply
:iconsagittariusgallery:
sagittariusgallery Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
Meh. The phrase "for crying out loud" was rather patronizing. I was responding in kind.

I do honestly hope my initial explanation clears up any confusion regarding simply blocking users from clipping from individual sites.
Reply
:iconbuysnsmall:
buysnsmall Featured By Owner Nov 30, 2010   Interface Designer
If there was little to zero variety in silhouette—and the dirndl-esque petticoated skirt can't be for the many—the items and trimmings exemplified the Vuitton knack for classy detail, as in fur buttons and collars and glittery heels. And above all, this Louis Vuitton show provided a charming backdrop to display the bags, Fendi,Burberry,Chanel,Louis Vuitton,Gucci,Coach.This season, it's a zillion mignonne reinterpretations of the classic Speedy. Here,([link]) ([link]) ([link])that functional shape, designed in the 1930's, came flocked and sequined, smothered in guipure lace over satin, or woven in metallic thread and done up in fox.
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:iconwinters-avatar:
Winters-Avatar Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2009
If a large company is involved then there is nothing "legal" about this. I wonder if we can take polyvore to court... or something to that effect. Anything to get this site shut down and the artwork theft STOPPED
Reply
:iconrinafanel:
RinaFanel Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
The only thing I have to say about this is that though there are a few Polyvore users that actually understand copyright laws, is that there are thousands more that just don't care.

I DO NOT GIVE ANY PERMISSIONS For my art to be used outside of Deviantart. And if I due I ask for compensation. Why? Because THIS is my job, how I support myself.

I've seen countless collages on the internet using MY FRACTALS! That's my work going down the drain. It's not just polyvore either. There are people that I've seen go into any art site, take an image, print it off or download it, then SIGN THEY'RE NAME TO IT.

I don't care if it's not polyvore's fault or the users. I actually think a petition is a good idea. I know there are probably going to be many polyvore.com users that are going to be upset about this but think of the message it will send.

If Polyvore gets shut down, and it being one of the major image players, especially by a petition of a lot of people, maybe someday it will be heard that copyright's are important.

We're not trying to sound completely outraged, though we should, we're just trying to keep our art OURS. We put our heart and soul into making our images and we'd like to think that people understand that. But I'm sorry to say that art theft, in any form, is art theft. Whether you are doing it knowingly or unknowingly. I'm glad to hear that some users credit their sources, that makes me happy all the same that I still get credit for my art, but how about all those others that don't?

The problem is that even if we only keep going back to ask them to remove the images, it's that people keep putting them up. There's just too many people doing it. Because of that everyone is going to take a fall because we can't sort through all the good users who understand copyright. Millions of people use this sight. That's a lot of people to go through and find who does everything by the book and who does it.

Even if the site doesn't get shut down, we're simply trying to keep artists informed about their art. Yes this is going to continue to happen, and yes we're going to fight that too. Simply put we have every right to be upset.
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:iconhalf-hearted-fantasy:
Hm.
I use Polyvore.com myself, and I completely know the issue that you're talking about.

I sort of make these "art" sets too, but before I'm mobbed, hear me out.

IF I use any pictures, I never use any from deviant art.com, and I credit the artist, name of picture, and source.

Now that doesn't make it right, but all I'm trying to say is don't hate them/us. Although, I must say, if they don't credit you, they deserve whatever hell you throw at them ;)

Just ask them to take it down. This happened to me once, and I took it down immediately, with an apology.

We really don't mean it, and the majority of people make fashion sets. Although I haven't made an "art" set in a good time, I use my own photo-manipulations from deviantart (On my other account).

Oh, and I truly think that this is NOT the staff of polyvore's fault. I acutally admire them for standing by their users, but trying to stop the copyright infringement issue. I hope that your problem ends quickly, and you're photos taken down from there :)
Good luck!
Reply
:iconebolabears:
EbolaBears Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2009
Nothing legal is going to happen until a large company has it's stuff swiped and manipulated and that company feels it has a strong enough case to seek damages.
Reply
:icongalefra:
galefra Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2009
The problem with Polyvore is that as soon as I write to them asking them to take down a bunch of my images, 3 days later more are up on their website. So we'd have to be contacting them twice a week.

We have already suggested the simple javascript app. that could be added to their member upload pages, but they choose to do nothing.

Polyvore has set up a blog called :
[link]
entitled Official Blog of Polyvore.com An Important Note About Copyright.
In that blog, not one single Polyvore staff member identifies themselves. When their members say that Polyvore allows them to use our copyrighted images, no staff person interjects to correct their false idea about Copyright Laws. When any person, like myself states the correct copyright
laws, someone answers and takes pot shots at a spelling error I've made, to try to discredit my comment and to deflect the spotlight off the true issue of copyright theft. Not a single Polyvore staff person interjects to educate the members about copyright infringement and laws ...
instead they remain silent, or worse ... if the member called "mijori" is a
staff person, then they are actually making a full on, conscious attempt to thwart the effort to teach members about copyright. I believe the reason for this is that their online venture benefits from their members using stolen images, because then Polyvore doesn't have to provide them with an Image Library, which would be costly.
Reply
:icon12inchdiva:
12inchDiva Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2009
Sorry you have to deal with that. The amount of entitlement-minded whining in the comments to that blog entry are disgusting.

I hope you guys can get the host to pull the plug on the site. The webmasters obviously don't care at all what people do with their service, as long as it makes them money.
Reply
:icongalefra:
galefra Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2009
Yes, but I think if we just keep persisting, they will eventually take some proactive steps to deal with the copyright theft. I am hoping they will add a javascript app, similar to the one when people leave comments on the sets ... that says "Are you the owner of this image "yes" "no". If not, you must get permission from the copyright owner". This alone would go a long way to resolve the issue.
Reply
:icongalefra:
galefra Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2009
Polyvore members are often repeat offenders. One of their members Olivia2010 had posted about 7 of my images. When I asked her to take them down she scoffed at me and refused. I wrote to Polyvore. They took them down, but she then put up my image again a few weeks later.

These people haven't a clue about Copyright Law. I recently graduated from a Law course on Internet and New Media Law. Nations now adhere to the Berne Copyright Convention which states that any art or image created privately and originally after April 1, 1989 is copyrighted and protected whether it has a notice or not. By default the work is copyrighted and may not be copied or used without permission. This means artists / photogaphers do not have to stamp, label, watermark, declare their copyright ownership on the image. Ownership is implicit. And there are stiff fines for image theft.

Polyvore has set up a blog regarding copyright and image theft. There seems to be no one overseeing the blog, so if people say nonsense about being allowed to steal images without restriction, no one from Polyvore is trying to educate them about Copyright Laws. I believe this is because Polyvore is benefitting financially from their members using our images without consent. Polyvore then does not have to pay to provide their members with a legitimate, legal image library. So Polyvore is directly benefitting by doing nothing other than removing the image after the artist or photographer jumps through a bunch of hoops over and over again.

I suggested to them that they add a simple javascript app. onto their member's upload page that would ask: "Do you own the copyright to this image, or do you have explicit permission to use this image" checkbox : "yes". If the answer is "no", then the member aborts the upload. If they check "yes", then another javascript box comes up saying, "if this is later found to be false, your membership will be revoked and there should be a link to Polyvore's Copyright Policy (if they have one).

This solution is simple to implement and is not costly. They can further have an auto-naming system that appends the uploader's name or ID to the image name string. This way, even if others on the website use the images afterwards, Polyvore would know who the first person to upoad the stolen image and could revoke that person's membership. Very simple.

I encourage everyone to comment on Polyvore's ridiculous blog where they make no effort to educate their members. Let them know how angry and upset you are. Only by doing so will they eventually try to resolve this issue. Here's the link:
[link]
Reply
:iconuncommondepth:
uncommondepth Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2009
The artistic community should band together to sue Polyvore. It's the only way these leeches are going to stop. Would any US citizens be interested in starting the process? Could we look into a class action lawsuit so no one individual has to bear the burden themselves?
Reply
:iconyuramekimeki:
yuramekimeki Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2009
As a Polyvore member, I think that this is just getting out of hand. Especially the fact that there's an ongoing petition to shut down Polyvore. You have my support to try to stop the infringement, as do the people trying to keep Polyvore up and running.
Reply
:iconbnspyrd:
Bnspyrd Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2009  Professional General Artist
Polyvore doesn't remove any watermarks or copyright marks, whoever rips the art in the first place does that.

I have been a member of Polyvore for 6 months ever since I found one of my images from DA on there. By the way, DA is now blocked from clipping, as are many other sites. And I have have been an active member of Polyvore ever since.

I think you'll find that there are other sites on the web who steal your images and then upload them. A lot of people on Polyvore have no idea that deviantart.com exists. And the majority of the Polyvorians do, do the right thing when it comes to copyrights.

Frankly I'm sick of seeing another group of people, trying to shut down a community who are not for profit, and if anything are actually providing all of the items used in their collages/sets with free merchandising/advertising.
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:iconsagittariusgallery:
sagittariusgallery Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
I will advertise my own work, thank-you-very-much.

Frankly I am sick of the attitude that artists who have been ripped should be "grateful". I for one am not. I know others who feel the same. Our wishes should be respected...it's not just our wishes, it is a *guaranteed right by federal law*.
Reply
:iconbnspyrd:
Bnspyrd Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2009  Professional General Artist
If you don't like it then message/contact Polyvore itself to get your images removed, which in turn will remove said images from all sets, and their items.

That's what I did, on RedBubble and Polyvore and a multitude of other internet sites.

I chose to do that rather then write an angry news article about it. It might be Polyvore today, but next week, it will be some other site. And it will always continue to happen.
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:icongalefra:
galefra Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2009
I have been on several online forums and irate people have begun to invoice Polyvore for unauthorized use of their images. For example:
[link]
Here they have used my image 3 times. I charge US $500 per single use license of my art. So I will send them an invoice of $1500 for this 3 usage license. Send invoices to copyright@polyvore.com Use this same email address to request that your images be removed, but take a screenshot first, so that you will afterwards have proof of the theft, in case this becomes a Class Action Lawsuit which people have begun to discuss on several online forums.

Also please tell everyone you know to sign the online petition to shut Polyvore down. [link] So far 919 people have signed. People from deviantart, Flickr, Etsy, RedBubble, CGSociety are tired of having their images stolen by Polyvore over and over again. On numerous occasions I've asked them to remove my images, but their members upload them again and again. I wrote to them early this week, no sooner than they removed the images, they again uploaded more of my art.
Reply
:iconbnspyrd:
Bnspyrd Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2009  Professional General Artist
Actually I won't tell everyone I know to sign that petition to shut Polyvore down. People can choose to do whatever they think is the right choice. And my choice is to not sign it.

[I'm a member of a few different online art related communities: Polyvore, DA, Flickr, RedBubble, to name but a few.]

:bulletred: Polyvorians include images in their creations that have been saved from people who frequent DA and are then re-uploaded to different sites, like photobucket, flickr, ffound, photoru, and numerous other foreign sites, which are then clipped and saved to Polyvore.

:bulletred: Polyvorians cannot clip images directly from deviantart.com because this site along with many other sites have been banned/blocked.
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:icongalefra:
galefra Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2009
Yes, I see your point. Since leaving that message, I now realize that the problem is not with Polyvore members, but with the deceptive interface of Polyvore's Image Library and Drag & Drop function. It invites people to freely drag and drop images and it appears to be a legitimate Image Library, owned and operated by Polyvore. It is understandable that Polyvore members innocently believe that these images are being offered to them freely. I now think that they are also merely victims of a deceptively designed website. By stocking its library with copyrighted images, Polyvore then avoids having to purchase a library of images for its members.

The Official Polyvore Blog [link] openly condones the use of copyrighted images. Several of my comments, stating copyright law (I just graduated from a Law course on Internet and New Media Law so I am up to date on recent laws on copyright) ... but mysteriously my comments go 'missing' from the Blog, although I do not violate any rules. Yesterday again for the second time my comment "disappeared", in stark contradiction to what Pasha Sadri, Polyvore's CEO, said to me in an email a few days ago, that "It is our policy not to censor public discourse" and further says that Polyvore respects the rights of others to express their viewpoints. This seems not to be the case and I have sent a letter to copyright@polyvore.com notifying them that my comments are going missing, even though I receive the confirmation message that Polyvore received the posts. Other people who are against copyright infringement have also mentioned on the blog that some of their comments have gone missing. [link]
Reply
:iconbnspyrd:
Bnspyrd Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2009  Professional General Artist
Interesting about what you're saying on copyrights and their blog, have you checked their forums as well, I'm not signed up with all that side of things.

The other day I did try to provide a link to deviantart.com which on my part is fair enough because I have art and resources here, but it wouldn't even let me do that, it now says something to the effect of "doesn't meet the communities policy" or something.

They would do better to act positively on all this now, rather then continue to mislead it's (mostly) youthful community.

Some of the more popular polyvorians are already creating offsite accounts where they are uploading there own resources to then clip to Polyvore. Resources that they've created themselves. They should create an option where we can actually upload our own handmade etc resources or images straight from our own pc's to the site, and not clip away at other sites.
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:icongalefra:
galefra Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2009
Yes, I actually like the Polyvore members a lot. They seem really sweet and I feel bad asking them to remove the image. But if I leave my image anywhere on the website, as per their policy, this gives permission for everyone to use it. Therefore I have to remove all of them. It makes me feel bad though. I wish that Polyvore would add a pop up message to the Drag & Drop function that would notify the member if they were dragging a copyrighted image. That would be a simple solution and I'm quite certain it would resolve the issue.
Reply
:iconsagittariusgallery:
sagittariusgallery Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
Heh. One can choose to do more than one thing.
Reply
:icongalefra:
galefra Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2009
Yes, I Polyvore members continually steal my art and when I ask them to take it down they refuse. When I contact the Admin, they remove it, but then the members put it back up shortly afterwards. I just wrote this email to copyright@polyvore.com a few minutes ago:

Hello,

Re: [link]
and [link]

And here is the link to my original art, which is entitled Amber [link] which has a very personal meaning and I made it for a friend named Amber. Here it is on my deviantart gallery: [link] and you can also see it on my main website: [link] in the Digital Art section, image 24. You can also view my art on my digital art blog: [link] if you require further verification that the original art is my own.

I wrote to you several months ago to report one of your members who had stolen my art (see other emails attached below). Once again this same person, Olivia2010 has stolen my art, which indicates to me that when you removed the prior images that I brought to your attention, you must not have contacted Olivia2010 to explain to her the repercussions of theft and copyright violation.

Please note I have NEVER posted any images to Polyvore. The only reason I've signed up to Polyvore is so that I can leave comments on MY stolen images to ask the person to remove it. I do not use your website for any other purpose.

I am additionally shocked that your members are continuing to tell me that Polyvore is giving them full permission to steal my art and use it however they want. This website is doing a very poor job of educating its members. I have never seen this kind of thing occuring on reputable sites like Flickr or deviantart or CGSociety where I also post my art and where abuse of copyrighted images is dealt with swiftly and all members are notified and educated, or else they are kicked off the website.

Olivia2010 stole many of my images in the past and very brazenly told me that she refuses to take them down and that anything posted on the Web is free for anyone to steal and use as they please. And today I see that another Polyvore member is mimicing the same nonsense in a comment on my stolen art image:

Mira_24 writes:
hey galefraney i think that u are not aware that polyvore allows us to take pictures from another sites and that those creations made by olivia are not really copied cause we all use pictures to create some set here!!! and i also think that if u put some digital creations to some web site it's cause u allow people to download them and do whatever they want with it! so get it over with and stop complaining cause she dosen't told anyone that she made the real picture only this set using the original picture! AND SHE IS NOT THE ONLYONE USING YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS :))))

I would like to know what is your website's policy is on repeated Copyright violators. Do you contact them to explain the correct policy once you remove the stolen images. I am grateful that you removed my stolen art images before but am still sick and disgusted that your members seem to have zero understanding of copyright. Does your site not have forums or send out Newsletters, or warning letters to violators.

I request that Olivia2010 and Mira_24 both be contacted and educated about Copyright and theft.

Please remove my stolen art immediately.

Most sincerely,

Gale Franey
Reply
:iconmeredithdillman:
MeredithDillman Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
It might work best to just send them a DMCA notice. You don't need to write anything personal because they are required by law to take it down anyway. Sometimes sites won't take things down simply because we didn't email the correct form letter.
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:icongalefra:
galefra Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2009
They respond quickly, but the problem is that they don't afterwards educate their members about copyright violation. Their members reoffend. One person, Olivia2010 took a bunch of my images, I contacted Polyvore, they immediately removed them, but soon afterwards she had stolen more of my images. Again I contacted Polyvore, again they took the image down ... and it continues.

The problem could easily be remedied if Polyvore added a javascript app. to their member's upload page that would open a box asking them the question "Do you own the copyright to this image or have you been given explicit permission to use this image" Checkbox: "yes" If the answer is "no", then they abort uploading the image. If "yes" they then see a message "By choosing "yes" you understand that if your answer turns out to be false your membership may be revoked"

In order that innocent Polyvore members who inadvertently use an image already stolen and uploaded by someone else, Polyvore just needs to implement an auto image naming system that adds the name of the original uploading member (ie: olivia2010) to the image name string. So afterwards if member judyInnocent is using the image, judyInnocent is not punished, olivia2010's membership is revoked and the stolen images from both of their collections are deleted.

Simple.
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:iconmeredithdillman:
MeredithDillman Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
I have the same problem with photobucket (having to report over and over) and we tried a petition with them which got a lot of publicity. Unfortunately nothing changed and many of the other photo sites have the same bad policies. It's would be really nice if these sites would care enough to do that but they probably understand they would lose most of their members and content if they did.

I don't actually know how uploads work there. I do know you block them from indexing images from a particular site if you were the site owner.

I joined so I could use the report button but I don't know if it's worked yet.
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:icongalefra:
galefra Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2009
PhotoBucket will remove stolen images within a few days if you write to abuse@photobucket.com and fill out a bunch of information. Here is a link to a letter I sent to them the other day: [link] Although I had to answer all their nonsense questions and make a bunch of formal statements, they did take the art down after I answered these questions.
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:iconmeredithdillman:
MeredithDillman Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
Yup, I do it all the time and they remove things quickly. But they also refused to change their policies so that prints were not offering by default, because the members don't know about all the setting.
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:icongalefra:
galefra Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2009
oh, interesting. :-)
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:iconcreepydolly:
creepydolly Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2009   Traditional Artist
may I ask what that site is you refer to in your comments there?
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:icongalefra:
galefra Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2009
Are you referring to the links to Polyvore, to my stolen art? I have included the links to the stolen art and to my original art in my galleries in my post. Or are you referring to a different website?

When I write Polyvore to complain about copyright theft, I write to copyright@polyvore.com

Let me know if this is what you are wanting to know.

Cheers,

Gale Franey :-)
Reply
:iconcreepydolly:
creepydolly Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2009   Traditional Artist
I was referring to a site you talked about in your comments on polyvore- you mentioned there is a site where you can search the net for your work (it looks for similar pixels)? I'd be interested to try that.
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:icongalefra:
galefra Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2009
oh, yes, that website has nothing to do with Polyvore. It is a separate website called TinEye [link] where you sign up and then you are able to enter the URL of any of your images. It will then bring up all websites on the internet that are using your image. Because it looks at pixels, it even detects your image if it is used within a collage. So even if the person doesn't credit your name and puts no reference to you in their html tags, tineye can still find the images.
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:iconmeredithdillman:
MeredithDillman Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
tineye.com

[link]
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:iconcreepydolly:
creepydolly Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2009   Traditional Artist
Thanks. That will be useful.
Reply
:iconilovedinosawrs:
ilovedinosawrs Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2009
I am an avid polyvore user. While I still can relate to the artists point of view, I would like some to look at this set: [link] and read a few comments. We aren't all bad, and every item put on polyvore links back to the original site it was clipped from. UNLESS it was clipped from a site that stole it from the orignal (for example, someone clipped the image from photobucket,and photobucket took it from deviantart, which is done often). In that case, someone should certainly take it up with photobucket.
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:iconmeredithdillman:
MeredithDillman Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
I didn't have any problem getting items from my own site removed back when people on etsy first discovered this, but I know there's still some from other sites I post on. Their reply email tried to tell me mot people were happy about this. I am guessing Gap cares a little less than we do whether some chops up a photo of a pair of pants.

"When people add items to Polyvore they can then be discovered by the rest of our community who may then click back to the site it came from to find out more about it and perhaps purchase the item. As such people are usually happy for us to have images that link back to their sites."
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:iconhikenude:
hikenude Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
Signed. Other ideas that artists could try:
• Contact set makers directly (if possible) with cease-and-desist demands.
• Organize boycotts of the businesses partnering with Polyvore (I know I saw A&F and American Eagle at a quick glance). In the current economy, I can't imagine any retailer risking even one customer over this.
Reply
:iconcreepydolly:
creepydolly Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2009   Traditional Artist
I am both an artist (who knows the woes of copyright infringement) and a polyvore user. I can identify with arguments on both sides of the issue. I wont go into my opinion on the matter as a whole, but I do want to advise against both of these suggestions.
Please DO NOT contact set-makers. While this might get that one set taken down, it wont remove your image from the system or insure that that image wont be used again 2 seconds later. Polyvore users are not able to remove individual images from polyvore. There is a "report" link next to every item/image on the site. Click that, fill out the report form, and your image will be removed within one day, and the sets that contain that image will be removed shortly thereafter.
Secondly, just as many artists work is being used without their knowledge, so are many retailer's items. To boycott all businesses who have products on polyvore would essentially be boycotting any business with a website. You can look at previous contests held in association with businesses to get an idea of some of the companies who are officially involved with polyvore, although I'm not sure what help boycotting those companies would do to your cause.
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:iconhikenude:
hikenude Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
I beg to differ. I stand by my suggestions as both effective and appropriate under the circumstances. However, it can't hurt to add your proposal of reporting infringing collections to try and have them removed from the system.

Contacting set-makers directly may be a required first step in pursuing a copyright infringement action. It couldn't hurt to let them know that their actions are unethical and that they are infringing copyright. In any event, direct communication with artists whose work they have "borrowed" can only be a good thing -- unless those set-makers want to pretend that they are not hurting a real person by their actions.

Certainly, if Polyvore is implying an association with retailers or other companies that does not exist, it can only be considered a service to make those businesses aware of it. Businesses usually seem to be wary of being drawn into copyright disputes. Organized boycotts would send a powerful message that artists will not tolerate theft of their work for use in this way. I can guarantee that most of those businesses have more money, and thus more power, than artists to effect change in Polyvore's operating method and user base.

Or maybe I'm dreaming. Maybe we really do just have to roll over, suck it up, and let them get away with it.
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:iconcreepydolly:
creepydolly Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2009   Traditional Artist
I still wouldn't advise those tactics, but you're certainly entitled to do whatever you see fit. Please just act responsibly and maturely if you do so. I've seen a lot of harassment and threats going on over at polyvore, and that's really not the way to go about getting someone to cooperate with you.

And, just as a disclaimer, I don't advocate the usage of copywritten work over at polyvore, and my own sets are strictly fashion. But I don't think shutting down polyvore is a suitable goal for fixing the situation, either. I'm hoping a compromise can be made.
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:iconsagittariusgallery:
sagittariusgallery Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2009  Professional Traditional Artist
Regarding individual cease and desists - someone tried that and they were told to basically piss off unfortunately. The set maker said "if you put your images online you take the risk", which of course is completely wrong.

It just goes to show Polyvore users are not aware of copyright laws. I do believe that is Polyvore's duty to educate them if they are to create such an arena that depends on the use of others copyrighted materials.

Thank you for signing the petition! I know someone contacted Disney and received a favorable response from their legal department.
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:iconhikenude:
hikenude Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
If cease-and-desist doesn't work, then turn the tables. Keep a record of their arguments that "you take the risk," then download their collages and post them back to your own gallery here (or wherever). Change something minor so that it's not a direct copy. It'd be even better if you could sell them as your own work. (Of course, most of the people I've met here are too moral to do that, but it would be a good tactic.)
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:iconerilisvampyre:
ErilisVampyre Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2009
Shame.
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:icon12inchdiva:
12inchDiva Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2009
Even when they credit the artwork, it's still being used for free in an advertisement for designer products. That's really gross.

There's no reason for their site to be archiving things that aren't for sale. I hope you guys can knock some sense into the webmaster(s).
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:icontomparkca:
tomparkca Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2009
I'l join the petition.
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